Tuesday, October 04, 2011

Sunday weigh-in #19

To be expected:

I had a terrible week food wise so I'm not surprised about the weight gain. I'm happy to hang out in the 150's (as long as it's the low 150's) until I'm more serious about wanting to lose weight. Right now is not that moment. So I'll keep tracking and weighing but I won't expect much.....

This week I participated in the 'run for the cure' 5K race. I beat my first time by almost 2 minutes. I did the race in just over 28 minutes.

That picture was taken post race. Do I look pregnant?

17 comments:

db said...

Yes (sorry). Could be the clothes, though. I'm guessing you're not pregnant because you're still trying to lose weight. Maybe you're bloated?

Anonymous said...

Did you lose the motivation to lose weight or you just don't want to deal with it right now? I have very stressful weeks in which I gain weight, but I usually have a top limit in my head and I won't let myself get past that.

Tanya said...

hmm got a theory going here. The two weeks you saw a significant gain were the two weeks you ran a 5k race the day before or the day of your weigh in. Maybe you just retained a lot of water from the race?

Why am I here??? said...

Hey anony! YES AND YES! I have no motivation AND I just don't really care right now. Any idea of what to do?

Mrs. Kim said...

Jen, this is kinda cliche but don't worry about the numbers, seriously. What good is weighing 130 if you're exhausted and hungry and feeling like crap about yourself? Rather weigh 155 and have energy and keep running/working out/going for walks with SH or whatever it is that makes you feel good when you're doing it. I don't know if the weigh-ins are such a good idea if the number fluctuations are just going to make you bummed/demotivated or pumped, conversely. Why not drop the scale and do what feels right and make good choices as often as you can?

Anonymous said...

Who says she's going to feel tired and crappy at 130? She's not there yet, so how can she know? And the scale is important at this point. Not when you're close to your goal (say, within five pounds of your goal or so), but if she still has 20 lbs. to lose (I think she mentioned her goal was 135), then a scale is good for accountability. 155 lbs. is too much weight for her height, and a scale is a good tool to help (anonymous nutritionist here).

Mrs. Kim said...

As a nutritionist you would know that every body has a baseline it's comfortable with and if you fight that you are going to end up exhausting yourself. Jen's body type may never be intended to be 130 regardless of the "ideal" height/weight ratio. I wasn't advising that she give up on her goal or start scarfing Twinkies, just saying she doesn't need to be so hard on herself. I would rather have a 150-pound happy, well-balanced Jen than a 130-pound, hungry/craving/miserable one. Maybe she would feel great at 130 pounds, who knows?! My point was it's not always just about the numbers.

Amyable said...

I agree with Mrs. Kim over the Anonymous Nutritionist. I think the height/weight ratio is a general guide and not a rule for everyone. Also, I know photos can add weight to you and I think Jen looks perfectly fine the way she is. If she wants to lose weight for better health or happiness, that's up to her but on the weight/height attractiveness scale, she's doing great already!

Anonymous Realist said...

Anonymous Nutritionist, perhaps you should read HEALTH AT ANY SIZE.

Furthermore, if scales were really useful, and if diets really worked, obesity would be on the decline, since people diet all the damn time.

Jen, I'm still wondering how your life would be different at 140 or 160. I asked several weeks ago and would be curious to know the answer.

Why am I here??? said...

Hi Mrs. Kim, I like what you said about not worrying about the scale. That's excellent advice. I started this not really caring about the scale but not I'm getting more and more caught up in it. In reality it should be about how I 'feel', which also means I have to care about my mental health. Thanks for the comment.

Hey nutritionist anony, I'm glad you still reading my site. I guess I do have some weight to lose but to be honest I am not in any rush to do it. I def. need to keep at it though. Do you have any advice for how I could keep doing what I'm doing but not get so caught up in numbers? Something that involves accountability but doesn't leave me thinking 'I can't keep doing this forever'. I was totally on the eating healthy kick for a good couple of month but now all I seem to want to eat is junk. Stress? emotions? Comfort? Laziness? I don't really know to be honest! But it's probably a combination of both!

Thanks for your kind comments Amy! I should also read that book too Anony realist.

I will make sure to do a post about weight and my feeling sometime soon as I can see people have been actively commenting on this.

Thanks again ladies (that's an assumption!)

anonymous nutritionist said...

No, I didn't imply she HAS to be 130. But she MIGHT feel healthier and better at that weight and she'll never know until she reaches it and sees how she feels about it. And no, there's no rush. The ideal weight loss is 1-2 lbs. per week, anyway. I wasn't advocating any diets either. I think you misunderstood. Unless you're obese, you don't need to make any drastic changes. It's the little things that count.

As for being healthy at any size, that's just a marketing fad. You can't be a 200-lb. woman and be healthy. You might want to argue the point with me, but I can tell, from a medical standpoint, it's just not possible. You might try to be healthier than another 200-lb. woman by making better choices, but that doesn't make you healthy, just makes you slightly healthier than somebody who's in really bad shape.

As for changes, you really don't need to focus on the scale. Use the scale to help you figure out if you're doing things right, but not as a measurement of complete success. The truth is that it shouldn't be difficult to lose or at least maintain weight from week to week. If you're gaining, there are two options: either you were starving when you lost weight and now your body is trying to adjust, or you are now eating more calories than you need. If you find yourself snacking on junk food because you're stressed, give yourself permission to do it once a day, but only once. Rather than eating junk snacks 2-3 times a day, do it only once. You can eventually cut it down even more, but just sticking to a single bad choice a day, rather than many, should help you break out the plateau.

Why am I here??? said...

I can def. cut back my snacking to 1 bad junk item a day and I think that will help tremendously since my problem is #2 (eating more calories than I should). I think you and Mrs. Kim are both on the right track. AND I need to focus on other parts of health like my emotional well-being and body image etc....

Thanks again ladies for your feedback!

Mrs. Kim said...

"You can't be a 200-lb. woman and be healthy."

Are you for real?

Sorry Jen, you're probably ready to be done with the comments on this post but I can't believe the ignorance that is out there.

Why am I here??? said...

Hey Mrs. Kim, no need to apologize. Are you referring to all aspects of health? I think the anony nutritionist is talking strictly in terms of medical health. To be honest, I'd rather be 150 pounds, work out, eat junk food once in a while as long as I felt happy than being 130 pounds, have to work out everyday and watch everything I put in my mouth. I'm sure there are several aspects of health that need to be taken into consideration.

I'm just starting to realize that no matter how healthy I eat, if I'm stressed then I'm really not that healthy. It's my stress that I need to learn to balance.

Anonymous said...

Anon Nutritionist, are you saying that as a nutritionist, you are more qualified to speak about a stranger's health than a doctor who actually works with that person?

You're full of shit.

Look at any number of athletes who are far above their "proper" BMI and tell me they aren't healthy.

Furthermore, I'm curious as to your credentials since in many countries pretty much anyone can claim to be a nutritionist.

Anonymous said...

Let me be more clear. In terms of medical health, a 200-lb. woman CANNOT be healthy. If you're 200 lbs. your body fat will be high. There are no ways around that.

And yes, athletes do not fall into the same group because their bodies are different. Jen is not training 6 hrs. per day, so she doesn't qualify. I should note, anyway, that you'll be hard-pressed to find WOMEN athletes who are 200 lbs. It's easy to use men as example. Don't. In any case, we're talking about the average population here, not specific people with special diets and training.

And I have a Master of Science in Nutrition and Clinical Health. I work at a hospital alongside doctors, in an area that treats morbidly obese patients. I know what I'm talking about. The problem is that people who are 200 lbs. or closer (which might be your case, since you're defending that number), want to believe their weight is healthy because it makes them feel better. It's a lie.

If you eat healthy most of the time, 150 lbs. is probably an acceptable weight. 200 lbs. is not.

Annie-Me said...

I love when your site heats up jen....I jsut bought a scale....I am 5 feet and 146 right now:( I'm in far worse shape hun and I'm so proud of the work you're doing. You are working at it more than you used to...and it's not the weight, its gettting out and doing some exercise...that will make your body healthy....Youare good sweetie :)